Tag Archives: Committee to Protect Journalists

CPJ.org Video Report: In pursuit of justice

A year after the massacre in Maguindanao province, a faltering Philippine legal system struggles to bring justice. From the murder scene in Ampatuan to the presidential palace in Manila, a CPJ delegation travels the country to examine the shocking attack and the many obstacles to winning convictions. Family members, justice officials, and political leaders talk about the challenges in this video, which premiered at the 2010 CPJ International Press Freedom Awards.

Video Report: Impunity on trial in the Philippines from Committee to Protect Journalists on Vimeo.


Human Rights Watch: Philippines: Investigate Killing of Massacre Witness

(New York) – The Philippine National Bureau of Investigation should immediately investigate the latest killing of a witness to the November 2009 massacre of at least 58 people in Maguindanao province, Mindanao, Human Rights Watch said today. Human Rights Watch called on the government to act swiftly to protect witnesses and their families.

An unidentified gunman shot and killed Suwaib Upham, a witness to the Maguindanao killings known publicly as “Jesse,” shortly after 8 p.m. June 14, 2010, in Parang municipality, Maguindanao. He had agreed to testify against members of the powerful Ampatuan family, who were accused in the killings, if afforded witness protection. Three months before he was killed, Human Rights Watch had raised protection issues regarding Upham with Justice Department officials in Manila, yet the department was still considering his request for protection at the time of his killing.

Source: HRW.org

Other News:

NYTimes.com – Rights Group Says Massacre Witness in Philippines Slain

BBC News – Witness to southern Philippine massacre shot dead

Inquirer.net – Rights group hits DoJ on massacre witness’ death

Aljazeera.net – Philippines massacre witness killed


CPJ.org: Another radio journalist killed in the Philippines

New York, June 16, 2010Philippine radio commentator Joselito Agustin was fatally shot by two motorcycle riding assailants while heading home from work late Tuesday evening near Baccara town in the northern Philippines, according to local and international news reports. The murder occurred just one day after the murder of radio journalist Desidario Camangyan in southern Mindanao.

Agustin died from four gunshot wounds on early Wednesday morning at a local hospital, the news reports said. Agustin, 37, a broadcaster with the DZJC Aksyon Radyo-Laoag station, was known for his scathing on-air commentaries against official corruption and other illegal activities, according to news reports. His nephew, who was riding pillion on Agustin’s motorcycle when he was shot, survived a gunshot wound to his leg, according to the reports.

To read the full article, please click here


CPJ seeks justice in murders of Philippine journalists

On June 9, CPJ addressed a letter to President-elect Benigno Aquino calling on him to take measures to quell the high rate of impunity in media killings during President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo’s tenure. The Philippines placed third on CPJ’s 2010 Impunity Index, a statistically derived list of global countries which consistently fail to address journalist killings.

Here is the full content of the letter

Senator Benigno S. Aquino III
Rm. 526, 5th Floor
GSIS Building
Financial Center
Roxas Blvd, Pasay City
Manila
Philippines

Via fax: (632) 552-6601

Dear President-elect Aquino:

With your recent election to office, we are looking forward to engaging with your administration on press freedom-related issues in the years ahead. It is our particular hope that you will translate your strong electoral mandate into a firm commitment to end the culture of impunity that has resulted in the extraordinarily high number of media killings in the Philippines.

In your campaign speeches and press interviews, you promised repeatedly to break from the corruption that has plagued previous governments and create an independent commission to investigate the various allegations of corruption and misgovernance leveled against outgoing President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo’s administration.

We recommend that you immediately launch a probe into the circumstances surrounding last November’s Maguindanao massacre, the single deadliest attack against the press anywhere in the world since CPJ started monitoring violations in 1981. Thirty-two journalists and media workers were among the 57 people killed in the election-related violence that has implicated members of the politically influential Ampatuan clan.

Despite the local and international outcry condemning the killings, indications are that the judicial process may be compromised by political considerations. In April, acting Justice Secretary Alberto Agra dropped charges against two top suspects—Zaldy Ampatuan, the former governor of the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao, and his uncle, Akmad Ampatuan, former mayor of Mamasapano—against the advice of the public prosecutors working on the case.

Although Agra later reinstated the charges on the basis of newly submitted evidence, his willingness to intervene by overruling the Quezon City Regional Court that is hearing the case underscored how vulnerable judicial processes can be to political pressures in the Philippines. There have also been reports by a highly regarded press group, the Center for Media Freedom and Responsibility, that family members of victims have been approached with offers of money to drop charges against Ampatuan clan members.

With these developments in mind, we urge you to provide full support and ample resources to the relevant Justice Department agencies to ensure a free, fair, and speedy trial in this landmark case. It is our strong belief that convictions of the masterminds and the assailants involved in the Maguindanao massacre would be a meaningful first step in breaking the cycle of murder and impunity that has taken so many media members’ lives in the Philippines.

Our concerns about the deteriorating press freedom situation in your country unfortunately are not confined to the Maguindanao killings. Unpunished media killings are endemic: CPJ’s Global Impunity Index, released in April, ranked the Philippines as having the third-worst record in the world for bringing the killers of journalists to justice—trailing only Iraq and Somalia. It is a record unbefitting Asia’s oldest democracy, and should be addressed immediately.

Your predecessor initiated a unit of the Philippines National Police, known as USIG, dedicated to investigating and resolving media and other extrajudicial killing cases. Regrettably, the USIG has been unsuccessful in achieving substantial convictions in 62 of the 68 journalist murder cases recorded since 1992, according to CPJ research. CPJ believes that only partial justice was reached in the other six cases.

Task Force USIG member Police Chief, Henry Libay told CPJ in July 2009 that the mishandling of evidence and a lack of witnesses willing to testify were major impediments to serving justice. He said that witnesses shied from the courtroom out of fears of reprisal, lack of financial support, and a general distrust of law enforcement.

We understand that your administration will face obstacles in reversing these trends and breaking the culture of impunity that has resulted in so many media killings, but this should not be an excuse for inaction. A sincere government commitment to press freedom and the protection of journalists is essential to achieving the democratic aspirations embodied in your strong mandate to rule and reform.

Again, we look forward to working with you and your administration on protecting journalists and journalism in the Philippines.

Sincerely,

Joel Simon
Executive Director


CPJ lists Ampatuan massacre deadliest in press history

The Committee to Protect Journalists considers the November-23 Ampatuan Massacre in Maguindanao among the worst for journalists, calling it “one of the deadliest single events for the press in memory.”

UNTV van

UNTV van unearthed from the site of the Ampatuan Massacre

Prior to the November-23 massacre, a National Union of Journalists of the Philippines record indicates that there are more journalists and media workers killed in the country under the Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo administration since 2001 than under any other regime in the Philippines.

Following the fall of the Marcos regime and the People Power revolt in 1986, there are at least 104 journalists killed in the country, based on records provided by the NUJP.

CPJ lists some other deadly media-related events here